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关于EI

EI的历史

工程索引(Ei)由密苏里州圣路易斯华盛顿大学的土木工程教授约翰·巴特勒·约翰逊博士于1884年成立。约翰逊博士在回忆录中写道,作为一名工程教授,他最大的挑战是缺乏工程文学知识。因此,他开始为“永久价值的文章”建立索引并撰写摘要。约翰逊博士的笔记在同龄人和学生中迅速流行,不久他便在《工程学会协会杂志》的月度专栏中发表他的笔记。

1918年,Ei被美国机械工程师学会收购。同年,在安德鲁·卡内基(Andrew Carnegie)的捐赠下,埃伊(Ei)搬到了纽约市的联合工程中心(United Engineering Center)。值得注意的是,此举将Ei与工程学会图书馆共存于一处。这是Ei与技术图书馆之间紧密合作关系的开始,一直持续到今天。

Ei是计算机化的早期采用者。1967年,第一个Ei电子公告以机器可读格式发布。每个“工程师的当前信息带”(CITE)包含1000份电气摘要和500份塑料摘要,并且每月邮寄给500个订户。1969年1月,CITE演变成一个机器可读的程序,称为COMPENDEX(计算机化工程inDEX)。每月一次将超过5,000条数字记录邮寄给订户。1995年,EngineeringVillage.com正式启动,目前是12个数据库的在线搜索平台。今天,COMPENDEX仍然是世界上最重要的工程书目辅助数据库服务,而EngineeringVillage.com包含从专利,电子书到会议记录等各种信息。

多年来,Ei与信息爆炸并驾齐驱。在约翰逊博士的第一本出版物发表70年后的1954年,EI发表了百万分之一的摘要。仅仅21年后,Ei发布了其第200万篇摘要,反映出信息量不断增加。如今,Compendex拥有超过2000万条记录,每年增加80万条。

1998年,爱思唯尔(Elsevier)购买了Engineering Information,并继续出版Compendex摘要和Engineering Index。从那时起,Ei和Engineering Village一直在增长。如今,Engineering Village拥有超过12个包含摘要,专利和电子书的数据库,是工程研究人员的黄金标准。

多年来,已经添加了重大改进,以为研究人员提供更好的搜索工具。然而,自1884年以来,Ei背后的研究,信息,内容和技术发生了显着变化,但一件事仍然是不变的:一种信念和愿景是,合并的公开信息资源可以使工程师的工作更加轻松。

大事记

1884年:圣路易斯华盛顿大学的约翰·巴特勒·约翰逊博士撰写了《工程索引》的第一卷

1918年: Ei被美国机械工程师学会收购

1967年:出版了第一本“工程师当前信息带”(CITE)。

1969: CITE演变成一个机器可读的程序称为COMPENDEX(COMP uterized EN gineering在DEX)

1975年: Ei出版了第二百万篇摘要

1995年: EngineeringVillage.com推出,使Compendex可以在万维网上使用

1998年:爱思唯尔收购Ei

2007年: EnCompassLIT和PAT,Chimica,CBNB和PaperChem迁移到EV平台

2009年: Ei庆祝成立125周年

The History of EI

Engineering Index (Ei) was founded in 1884 by Dr. John Butler Johnson, a professor of Civil Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. In his memoirs, Dr. Johnson wrote that his greatest challenge as an engineering professor was his lack of knowledge of engineering literature. Thus, he started to index and write abstracts of "articles of permanent value." Dr. Johnson's notes rapidly grew in popularity among his peers and students, and soon he was publishing his notes in a monthly column in the Journal of the Association of Engineering Societies.

In 1918, Ei was acquired by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. That same year, under an endowment by Andrew Carnegie, Ei moved to the United Engineering Center in New York City. Significantly, this move co-located Ei with the Engineering Societies Library. This was the beginning of a tight collaborative relationship between Ei and technical libraries that continues to this day.

Ei was an early adopter of computerization. In 1967, the first Ei electronic bulletin was posted in machine readable format. Each "Current Information Tape for Engineers" (CITE) contained 1,000 electrical and 500 plastics abstracts and were mailed to 500 subscribers every month. In January 1969, CITE evolved into a machine-readable program called COMPENDEX (COMPuterized ENgineering inDEX). Over 5,000 digital records were mailed to subscribers once a month. In 1995, EngineeringVillage.com launched, and currently serves as the online search platform for 12 databases. Today, COMPENDEX remains the world's foremost engineering bibliographic secondary database service, and EngineeringVillage.com contains information ranging from patents to e-books to conference proceedings.

Through the years, Ei kept pace with the information explosion. In 1954, 70 years after Dr. Johnson's first publication, EI posted its one millionth abstract. Just 21 years later, Ei published its two millionth abstract, reflecting the ever-increasing amount of information. Today, Compendex has over 20 million records, with more than 800,000 added annually.

In 1998, Elsevier purchased Engineering Information, which continued to publish Compendex abstracts and the Engineering Index. Since then, Ei and Engineering Village have continued to grow. Now, with over 12 databases containing abstracts, patents, and e-books, Engineering Village is the gold standard for engineering researchers.

Over the years, significant enhancements have been added to provide researchers with better search tools. Yet while the research, information, content and technology behind Ei have changed significantly since 1884, one thing remains the same: the belief and vision that one consolidated resource of published information can make the engineer's job easier.

Milestones

1884: Dr. John Butler Johnson of Washington University in St. Louis writes first volume of the Engineering Index

1918: Ei is acquired by the American Society for Mechanical Engineers

1967: The first "Current Information Tape for Engineers" (CITE) is published

1969: CITE evolved into a machine-readable program called COMPENDEX (COMPuterized ENgineering inDEX)

1975: Ei publishes its two millionth abstract

1995: EngineeringVillage.com launches, making Compendex available over the World Wide Web

1998: Elsevier purchases Ei

2007: EnCompassLIT & PAT, Chimica, CBNB, and PaperChem migrate to the EV platform

2009: Ei celebrates its 125th anniversary